Welcome to another installment of If My Book, the Monkeybicyclefeature in which authors shed light on their recently released books by comparing them to weird things. This week George Salis writes about Sea Above, Sun Below, his novel just published by River Boat Books.

If Sea Above, Sun Below were a historian, she would drink the ink of all those dusty textbooks and regurgitate it into a crystal ball which could show you the clouded truth.

If Sea Above, Sun Below were a country, its borders would melt and reemerge in other places: at the bottom of the sea, between the horizon, and on the forehead of a frazzled librarian.

If Sea Above, Sun Below were a childhood, it would be forgotten to protect the man who has grown around it, leaking memory droplets that contribute to an invisible and unfelt waterboarding.

If Sea Above, Sun Below were an alcoholic beverage, it would numb your tongue and cause you to literally hangover, that is, over the ledge of a leaning skyscraper so that you could see the tiny people as animated homunculi.

If Sea Above, Sun Below were a question, it would be its own answer, causing a feedback loop of ouroboric proportions.

If Sea Above, Sun Below were a psychoanalyst, he would use a chromium mirror to show you your own dreams through the eyes of a stranger, evoking a nourishing dose of déjà vu.

If Sea Above, Sun Below were a mathematical proof, it would fill in the missing threads of string theory, but, upon waking, the physicist Brian Greene would realize that the strings came from a broken violin, the fringe on a denim jacket, and his own missing shoe.

If Sea Above, Sun Below were a surgery, it would only excise or transplant 21 grams from the base of your brain, that ostensible nest of the soul.

     
George Salis is the award-winning author of Sea Above, Sun Below (River Boat Books, 2019). His fiction is featured in The Dark, Black Dandy, Zizzle Literary Magazine, MadScientistJournal, The Sunlight Press, Unreal Magazine, and elsewhere. His criticism has appeared in Isacoustic, Atticus Review, and The Tishman Review, and his science article on the mechanics of natural evil was featured in Skeptic. He is the editor of TheCollidescopeand is currently working on an encyclopedic novel titled Morphological Echoes. He has taught in Bulgaria, China, and Poland. www.GeorgeSalis.com